Freebie Friday! More Color-by-Note worksheets

This worksheet reinforces finding C, D, and E on the keyboard as well as asks students to recognize quarter notes and half notes.


This sheet is a little more advanced. It asks students to recognize C, D, and E on the treble clef and recognize quarter, half, and whole notes.

I hope you enjoy these resources for your piano students. Please share and consider liking us on Facebook (link).

Freebies: Color by Musical Note Worksheets for Beginners

I’ve been making these sheets on my own for students. I’d tried using the Color by Note series, which is great, but it doesn’t match the other methods I use with these beginning students. So I’ll be sharing a lot of these over the next few weeks.

Here’s a preview of the worksheet.

piano worksheets
Seal Coloring sheet with CDE on keys and quarter note.

To download, go to PianoNOLA > For Teachers. 

Feel free to collect some of my older resources while you are visiting.

Happy teaching!

Freebie! Simple interval identification flowchart and accompanying online quiz

Greetings!

Teaching my beginner students intervals, I often find that they want to count the lines and spaces for each interval rather than looking at the patterns of how these intervals look.

In an effort to retrain one of my students, I came up with this handy flowchart to help her approach the answer correctly, using the method I’d like her to learn. So now, I’m going to share it with you lucky people.

A note: This chart only addresses generic 2nds, 3rds, 4ths, and 5ths (not major, minor, perfect, etc).

You can get the flowchart here.  Below’s a preview.

music theory flowchart

After I get the student to understand the ins and outs of the flowchart, I give them this easy online exercise (and they can use the flowchart to work the problems.)

Here’s the link.  It’s customized by me to only include the relevant intervals, so you’ll need to bookmark the link to have the same quiz each time. Or you can always customize it yourself, but who wants the extra work, right?

Free treble clef note reading worksheet

I’ve added a new worksheet that you can download for free. In order to get it, you’ll need to like my Facebook page. Once you’ve done that, find the tab that says Fan Freebies and follow the links.  You can see a preview of the worksheet below.  Let me know if you have any trouble downloading it.

note identification

The worksheet itself is a treble clef note ID worksheet.  It uses C position, Middle C position, and G position notes (or C4 through D5).  As a little lagniappe, there are some vocabulary questions at the end.

Piano Teacher NOLA

PS.  This worksheet was created using the VexTab Music Notation Add-on for Google Docs.  If you haven’t tried it, you should!  It’s great for making simple worksheets.

PPS.  Unfortunately, VexTab doesn’t allow notation on a grand staff, so it is somewhat limited.  But then again, it’s freeeee!

Free Worksheet! Note naming C Position Treble and Bass Clef

I’m finally starting to get the hang of creating my own worksheets using a combo of Finale and Word. To celebrate, I’d like to share one with you. There will be lots to follow as I get more proficient with it.

It’s suitable for all ages and is available with an illustration and without.

music theory worksheets

To download the pdfs, as always, visit my website here.   The file names are NameCpos1.pdf and NameCpos1_iluus.pdf (for illustrated one).

Free Music Theory worksheet!

Frontispiece from a 1685 musical theory book by Manuel Nunes Silva called: ‘Arte minima, que com semibreve prolaçam tratta em tempo breve, os modos da Maxima, & Longa Sciencia da Musica..’ at the Portuguese National Digital Library.

I’m posting a new music theory worksheet for more advanced students.  I’ve used this one with adult students or high-school aged students to get them to recognize their scales, arpeggios, inversions, and cadences on paper.  I find that while some students have no problem learning to play these exercises, they can’t quickly connect the written music with the thing they are playing — it’s so useful to be able to recognize these things when reading music!

Find the worksheet here.

I also have a number of students who have trouble remembering the differences between inversions and cadences (because both are exercises involving chords), so I used this to try and help.

Hope you enjoy!

NOTE:  This is ideal for a student who can play scales, arpeggios, cadences and inversions in C major and G major but who needs practice writing them out or recognizing them in music.

Free music theory worksheets

I’ve been using things with a decent amount of success for my beginning students.  They are available for free on the website linked below.  I’ll be posting more recommendations in the coming weeks.

Color That Note (download PDF)

It All Adds Up (download PDF)

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